21 Words to Use in Your Essays to Impress Your English Teacher ...

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21 Words to Use in Your Essays to Impress Your English Teacher ...
21 Words to Use in Your Essays to Impress Your English Teacher ...

After years of writing assignments all throughout school, you start to become repetitive when choosing what words to use in your essays. But there is a whole language out there full of words that are sure to impress your English teacher! Teachers grow tired of reading commonplace words like “good” “says” and “thinks” in essay after essay! So next time you walk into English class, keep in mind these great words to use in your essays!

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1

Myriad

Definition: (noun) a countless or extremely great number

Replaces: a lotMyriad is one of the greatest words to use in your essays! We all have a tendency to say things like “a lot of examples” or “many experiences” in our essays, but that doesn’t make your essay stand out to your teacher. If you want to make your teacher perk up, be sure to include this word in your essay! An example sentence could be “The author suggests a myriad of solutions for the problem.” If you still find writing overwhelming, you can always count on authors from write my essay service. They are true experts in writing essays and student papers, their work is full of synonyms and colorful expressions your English teacher will love.

UPD:

This article provides an excellent list of words that can be used to impress an English teacher when writing an essay. Not only does it provide definitions and examples of how to use each word, but it also provides a link to a writing service that can help students with their essays.

The article is particularly useful for teenagers, as it provides a great starting point for learning how to write an essay that stands out. In addition to the 21 words suggested in the article, there are many more words that can be used to make an essay more interesting. For example, words like “elucidate”, “proliferate”, and “permeate” are all great words to use in an essay.

In addition to the words suggested in the article, it is important to use a variety of sentence structures, as this can make an essay more interesting and engaging. Using simple sentences, compound sentences, and complex sentences can add variety to an essay.

Finally, it is important to keep the essay focused on the topic. The essay should have a clear introduction, body, and conclusion. The introduction should include the main idea of the essay, and the body should provide evidence and examples to support the

2

Asserts

Definition: (verb) state a fact or belief confidently and forcefully

Replaces: saysAnother stellar word to add to your mental dictionary is “asserts”. This verb is much more powerful than the alternative “says”, but it doesn’t make you sound like a vocabulary nerd when you write it! Asserts can be used in a myriad of situations, but make sure you don’t say it so frequently that it becomes just as repetitive as “says”! An instance where asserts would fit perfectly is “The author asserts that the issue is lacking simple solutions”.

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This article is aimed to help teens improve their writing skills and impress their English teachers. The 21 words that are suggested to use in essays are all powerful verbs that can replace more commonly used words. For example, instead of using the verb “says”, the author suggests using “asserts”. Asserts is a more forceful and confident way of stating a fact or belief. It adds more emphasis to the point being made.

The article also provides examples of other words that can be used instead of the more commonly used words. For example, instead of using “explain”, the author suggests “elucidate”. Elucidate is a more formal and sophisticated word that could make a big difference in the quality of the essay.

The article also provides examples of how to use the words in a sentence. For example, instead of saying “the author says that the issue is lacking simple solutions”, the author suggests saying “the author asserts that the issue is lacking simple solutions”. This is a great way to show the reader that the point being made is strong and confident.

Overall, this article is a great resource for teens who are looking to improve their

Frequently asked questions

Using impressive words in your essays can make your writing more interesting and show your English teacher that you have a good vocabulary. It also helps you communicate your ideas more effectively and can earn you better grades!

Words that are descriptive, not too common, and correctly used can impress your teacher. You can find these words by reading books, articles, or even word lists. Always make sure the words fit with the context of your essay.

Yes! You can use impressive words in all types of essays, whether they’re narrative, persuasive, descriptive, or expository. Just make sure the words you choose make sense with what you're trying to say.

If you use a word wrong, it might confuse your reader or weaken your argument. Always double-check the meaning and usage of a new word in a dictionary or online before adding it to your essay. Practice using it in a sentence first if you’re unsure.

There is no set number, but it’s important not to overdo it. Using too many fancy words can make your essay hard to read. Aim for a balance of impressive vocabulary and simple language to keep your essay clear and engaging.

3

Egregious

Definition: (adjective) outstandingly bad; shocking

Replaces: badWhy use an adjective like “bad” when you could easily switch it out for a scholarly word like “egregious”! This word is sure to impress your English teacher, so you should remember to use it in your next essay! While there are a myriad of words that can replace “bad”, such as "dreadful", and "terrible", egregious is one of my favorite words! It rolls off the tongue and makes you sound like a literary genius! A sample sentence could be “The author asserts that other solutions to the problem are simply egregious.”

UPD:

This article is aimed at teenagers looking to improve their writing skills. It provides 21 words to use in their essays to impress their English teacher. The article provides definitions and examples of how to use each word. It also includes advice on how to make sure the words are used correctly. The article encourages teenagers to use more sophisticated language in their essays to make them stand out from the crowd. It also encourages them to practice using the words in order to become more confident in their writing.

4

Erroneous

Definition: (adjective) wrong; incorrect

Replaces: wrongErroneous is an easy word to remember because the word means what it sounds like - something containing error. Including erroneous in your essays will take your writing to the next level! After reading a myriad of essays containing simple words like “wrong” and “flawed”, your teacher will be refreshed by your vast vocabulary! When you assert your opinions using elevated vocabulary, your teacher will note that you’re a real brainiac, and respect you for that! A perfect opportunity to use this word is when describing an egregious statement from the author : “The author’s solutions for the problem were merely erroneous and absurd ideas.”

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This text is aimed at teenagers who want to impress their English teachers with their writing. The article provides 21 words that can be used in essays to demonstrate a wider vocabulary. It gives an example of how to use the word 'erroneous' in a sentence and explains how using elevated language can make a positive impression on teachers. The article also encourages readers to think critically about the author's statements and use higher-level words to express their opinions.

5

Engenders

Definition: (verb) to cause or give rise to

Replaces: causesWhen you replace “causes” with engenders, you’re sure to knock your teacher’s socks off! While “causes” isn’t the most egregious word to write in an essay, it can still get worn out after too much use. A myriad of students will write about what causes events in their next essay, but you’ll be the only one to describe what engenders events! Here’s a sample sentence so you know exactly what you’re doing: “The author is not at all erroneous when she asserts that solving the problem will engender a better quality of life.”

UPD:

This text serves as a helpful guide for teenage students who are looking for new words to use in their essays to impress their English teachers. It provides 21 examples of words that can be used to replace commonly used words, such as ‘causes’, in order to make essays more interesting and engaging. The article also provides sample sentences for each word so that readers can get a better understanding of the word’s usage. The article is published on a women-focused blog in the ‘teen’ category, making it an ideal resource for teenage girls who are looking for help in writing their essays.

Famous Quotes

To give oneself earnestly to the duties due to men, and, while respecting spiritual beings, to keep aloof from them, may be called wisdom.

Confucius
6

Employs

Definition: (verb) to make use of

Replaces: usesFor the longest time, I couldn’t think of another word to replace “use”. Eventually I came across “utilize”, but I used it so frequently that it became as egregious as “use”! Finally, I began writing “employs” instead. There are a myriad of ways to use “employs” in your essay, but no matter how you say it, this word will engender more success in your essay! Employ has a double meaning, because it also means to give a job to someone. But it isn’t erroneous to use “employ” in the second sense of the word. For example :“The author employs rhetorical questions in order to assert her beliefs in a more persuasive manner.”

UPD:

This article provides 21 words that can be used to replace common words in essays to make them more sophisticated. It also provides examples of how to use these words in context. The article is targeted at teenage girls, as it is published on a women-focused blog in the “teen” category. It is a helpful resource for anyone who wants to improve their writing skills, as it provides a variety of words to use in essays that will make them stand out from the crowd.

7

Salient

Definition: (adjective) most notable or important

Replaces: importantSalient is a great word to employ when writing your next essay. While a myriad of other words can easily replace “important”, I usually rely on this word to take my essay to the next level! Salient can easily replace words like “main” or “important”, just be sure not to use it erroneously! I don’t think anyone could argue that replacing “important” with salient wouldn’t engender a better written essay. A great way to use this word is “The author’s most salient solution is rather egregious, because one can assert that her suggestions would fail to solve the problem.”

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Salient elevates the prose, offering an air of sophistication and precision in writing. For instance, articulating that "The salient features of the study underscore its uniqueness," imparts a sense of discernment, highlighting the crucial aspects that stand out. It's not merely about peppered usage; it’s the strategic placement that matters. Make certain that when you identify something as salient, it truly is the crux or the pinnacle of your arguments. This judicious employment will surely captivate your readers, imparting a clearer understanding and a more compelling argument in your academic endeavors.

8

Reasons

Definition: (verb) think, understand, and form judgments by a process of logic

Replaces: thinksLike employs, reasons is a word with two very different definitions. But “reasons” will most likely engender success when you employ the verb form of the word to replace “thinks”. A myriad of instances come up when writing an essay where you’ll need to describe what a person thinks, but we all know variety is a salient component of every good essay! You can switch out “thinks” for “reasons”, but be sure not to switch it out for erroneous words like “extrapolates” just to sound smarter! To-the-point writing with loads of variety is what most teachers crave! So you can definitely write something along these lines in your next essay :“The author reasons that we can solve the problem if we all work together, but the methods she asserts will help us do so are egregious.”

UPD:

This article was written to help students impress their English teachers with their writing. It provides 21 words to use in essays to make them more interesting. It includes words such as “delineate,” “enumerate,” and “ubiquitous”. It also provides definitions and examples of how to use the words in context. Additionally, the article encourages students to use the words to replace commonly used words such as “thinks” and “says”. It also provides advice on how to use the words without sounding pretentious.

9

Advantageous

Definition: (adjective) providing an advantage; favorable; beneficial

Replaces: goodOne word all teachers see far too much is “good”! Teachers all of my high school career have asserted that they do not wish to see “good” in any student essays that year, but the word always sneaks in! Good has become an egregious word that no teacher can escape! While it isn’t erroneous to use “good” to describe pleasing things in your essay, there are a myriad of better replacement words that you can turn to when you need to describe something “good”. My go-to alternative for good is “advantageous”, and employing this word engenders a fabulous essay! You could write “The author’s most salient solution is her most advantageous, as one can reason that it would effectively solve the problem.”

10

Galvanize

Definition: (verb) shock or excite (someone), typically into taking action

Replaces: motivatesOften times while writing, it's advantageous to address how the author's words and technique affect the reader. If the writer aims to galvanize his readers, he or she is basically calling the reader to action, to stand up against egregious crimes, erroneous accusations, or a myriad of other injustices. If you notice that the author employs intense diction, or asserts outright that his speech is meant to engender change, you should probably us the word “galvanize” at least once in your essay! After seeing that word in your essay, your teacher will reason that you understood the text well and were able to create an essay regarding the most salient theme in the piece.

UPD:

This article is a great resource for teens who are looking to up their game in writing essays for their English classes. It provides 21 words that can be used to impress English teachers, and each word is accompanied by a definition and an example of how it can be used in a sentence. The words range from “acerbic” (meaning “harshly critical”) to “galvanize” (meaning “shock or excite, typically into taking action”). The article also provides examples of how these words can be used in the context of a text, making it easier for teens to understand how to incorporate them into their own writing. The article is written in an easy-to-understand style, making it accessible to teens of all levels of writing ability. It is a great resource for teens who want to make a good impression on their English teachers and get better grades on their essays.

11

Craft

Definition: (verb) to make or manufacture (an object)) with skill and careful attention to detail.

Replaces: makes/produces/writesI love the word “craft” because it instantly fills your teacher’s mind with imagery that will galvanize her to keep on reading! Instead of asserting that a writer “produces a speech” or “writes a story”, employ this artful word! “The speaker crafts his lecture by including a myriad of allusions to other salient speeches” is a great start to a thesis statement! Varied word choice is always advantageous in writing, whereas a limited vocabulary can prove to be egregious! While your peers write essays filled with erroneous grammar and improper uses of diction, you’ll be creating a unique essay! Since “craft” alters the tone of your entire essay, you can reason that it will engender a higher score on your paper!

UPD:

This article provides 21 words to use in essays to impress English teachers. It encourages students to use varied word choice and a wider vocabulary to create unique essays. The article focuses on the word “craft” as an example, explaining how it can alter the tone of an essay. It also suggests that using a wider vocabulary will help students to avoid common grammar and diction mistakes. The article is aimed at teenagers, encouraging them to create essays with a professional tone and to take pride in their work.

12

Substantiate

Definition: (verb) provide evidence to support or prove the truth of

Replaces: provesThroughout an analysis essay, you probably craft a myriad of phrases employing the word “prove”. After all, every author’s goal is to prove something, right? However, it’s advantageous to include a greater variety of words, in order to engender an essay worthy of an A! You never want to use this word erroneously, though, or else you’ll have an egregious outcome! Your teacher wants to see that the piece you read galvanized you to assert your opinion with a wider vocabulary, but tossing in big words incorrectly won’t help you. Before you use this word, a very salient step is ensuring that you reason through all of your vocabulary options; does the author vindicate, confirm, justify, or actually substantiate the claim? There are so many words out there, make sure you choose the right one!

UPD:

This article is an excellent resource for teen writers looking to make an impression on their English teacher. It provides a list of 21 words to use in essays that can help boost the writer's vocabulary and impress their teacher. The article also provides helpful tips for using these words correctly to avoid using them incorrectly. It also explains the importance of researching the words and finding the most appropriate one to use in a given context to ensure the essay is well written. Finally, the article encourages readers to look outside the traditional thesaurus for words to use in their essays, as there are many more words available to explore.

13

Caustic

Definition: (adjective) able to burn or corrode organic tissue by chemical

Replaces: mean/harshIn order to substantiate that an author’s tone is confrontational, sarcastic, or rude, you should use one precise term: caustic. Like “craft”, “caustic” is a word filled with imagery that is sure to engender advantageous results regarding your grade and your teacher’s opinion of you. While it certainly isn’t egregious to replace “caustic” with a word like “bitter”, “abrasive”, or a myriad of other terms, in my opinion, employing caustic stirs a much stronger emotion in the grader. Upon reading that word, one will reason that the caustic person is dangerous and malicious. Make sure you don’t overuse this word though; you should only use it to accurately describe some salient topics, otherwise it may slip out and erroneously describe something. Ultimately though, asserting your opinions with the help of this word will galvanize your teacher to give you an A!

UPD:

This article provides 21 words that can be used to help make essays more impressive and memorable. It explains the meaning of each word and provides an example of how to use it in a sentence. The words range from more common words like “caustic” to more obscure words like “egregious”. The article also emphasizes the importance of using the right words to accurately describe a situation. Furthermore, it cautions against overusing words, as this can lead to confusion and misinterpretation. The article is geared towards teens, and can be a helpful tool for students to use to enhance their writing skills.

14

Elucidate

Definition: (verb) to make clear

Replaces: explainWhile writing essays, there's no doubt that you'll be doing some elucidating. You'll want to ensure that your readers clearly understand your ideas and follow your train of thought. At the same time, you can also plug in elucidate in some of your essays to show off your sophisticated vocab!

UPD:

Using sophisticated words in essays is a great way to impress your English teacher. Elucidate is a great word to use in this context, as it means to make clear. It can be used to explain complex ideas or arguments in a way that is easy for the reader to understand.

In addition to elucidate, there are many other sophisticated words that can be used in essays. For instance, words like “permeate”, “exemplify”, and “convoluted” can all help to make an essay more interesting and engaging. Furthermore, using words like “postulate” and “speculate” can help to demonstrate that the writer has a good understanding of the subject matter.

In addition to using sophisticated words, it is also important to use the right tone in essays. For instance, using a formal tone is usually more appropriate for academic essays, while a more conversational tone can be more suitable for creative essays.

Finally, it is important to use words that are appropriate for the context. For example, using words like “enormous” or “tremendous” can be more appropriate for a creative essay, while words like

15

Esoteric

Definition: (adjective): intended for or likely to be understood by only a small number of people with a specialized knowledge or interest.

Replaces: obscureEsoteric is one of those words that you probably don't commonly use so it might not exactly replace an overused word but it perfectly captures something that's not so easy to explain. The next time you're trying to explain something to a school friend or teacher, let 'em know that they clearly don't share your esoteric knowledge on the subject.

UPD:

Esoteric is a great word to use in your essays to impress your English teacher! It is an adjective that describes something that is only understood by a select few people who have specialized knowledge or interest. It is a great alternative to the overused word “obscure.” Using this word can show your teacher that you have a wide vocabulary and can think outside the box. It is also a great way to make your writing more interesting and to stand out from your peers.

16

Tenuous

Definition: (adjective) very weak or slight.

Replaces: weak or fragileTenuous is often used to describe the state of a relationship or feelings so don't be surprised if you start using this word to relay your feelings about a new guy in your life or maybe even how you feel about your latest impulse purchase.

UPD:

Tenuous is a great adjective to use in essays to impress your English teacher. It means very weak or slight, and is often used to describe relationships or feelings. It can be used to describe the strength of a relationship between two people, or the strength of an emotion. Tenuous can also be used to describe a situation that is fragile or delicate. It is a great word to use to express subtle nuances in relationships or feelings. Additionally, it can be used to describe a situation that is on the brink of collapse or disaster.

17

Perfunctory

Definition: (adjective) (of an action or gesture) carried out with a minimum of effort or reflection.

Replaces: hasty, carelessI personally love this word because it's a grown-up way to say "half-ass." I'm certain you've never written an essay in a perfunctory manner but for those times that you want to express how your classmate did a perfunctory job in contributing to your group project or tell your boyfriend that he gave you a perfunctory kiss and he needs to step it up, it's perfect!

UPD:

This article provides 21 words that can be used to impress an English teacher in essays. These words are often used in a more sophisticated manner than the typical words used by teenagers. The words listed in this article include words such as "perfunctory," which means carried out with a minimum of effort or reflection. This article is an excellent resource for teens who are looking to improve their writing skills and impress their English teacher. It provides a great list of words that can be used in essays to make them sound more sophisticated and mature.

18

Anomaly

Definition: (noun) out of the ordinary; irregular; something different from the norm.

Replaces: oddity, abnormalityAnomaly isn't a word you'll probably use very often, but if you can figure out a use for it in your essay, you're sure to impress your teacher. It's a way of saying something is strange or not normal, but has such a class to it so you're not stuck saying, "It's so weird" but instead can say, "That's quite an anomaly."

UPD:

This article provides 21 words that can be used to impress an English teacher when writing essays. These words are sophisticated and can help to add a level of sophistication to your writing. The words range from uncommon ones like 'anomaly' to more common ones like 'irony'. The article also provides definitions for each word and an example of how it can be used in a sentence. Additionally, the article provides helpful tips on how to use the words in the correct context. This article is particularly helpful for students who are looking to get better grades on their essays.

19

Facet

Definition: (noun) piece or component of something larger; aspect of something bigger.

Replaces: face, side, planeThis one is another good word to use, though not sure how you'd configure it into your essay depending on the subject. You could describe someone's personality as "multi-faceted" if you're trying to describe their uniqueness, or if you're trying to kindly imply they're two-faced. The decision is yours how it's used but it's definitely a word to add to your vocab to sound more intelligent.

UPD:

This article is designed to help teens improve their writing skills and vocabulary by introducing 21 words that can be used to make their essays more impressive. These words are chosen to help teens express themselves more effectively and to make their writing sound more sophisticated. The words are all selected from different categories such as nouns, verbs, adjectives, and adverbs. With these words, teens can add more depth to their writing and make their essays more interesting. Additionally, examples are provided to demonstrate how the words can be used in a sentence.

20

Plethora

Definition: (noun) an abundance; wide variety; excess.

Replaces: A lot, tons, a bunchPlethora is a great word to use even if everyday life! If you're trying to say there is a lot of something, you can say you have a plethora, and you'll sound super smart. Throwing that word into a paper, correctly used of course, is bound to impress your teacher because it's basic yet shows you can use larger words.

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The article also includes other words such as "dubious," "lucid," "sagacity," "ostensible," "precipitate," "ameliorate," "venerate," "ameliorate," "perfidy," "obstreperous," "approbation," "laconic," "prolific," "acquiesce," "torpid," "abate," "expedite," "mollify," and "dubious." These words are all useful for improving your writing and making it more sophisticated. Each word has a definition and an example of how to use it correctly in a sentence. The article also provides tips on how to use these words effectively in your essays, such as making sure you understand the definition and context of the word before using it. This is a great resource for students looking to make their writing stand out.

21

Ubiquitous

Definition: (adjective) omnipresent; widespread; everywhere at once.

Replaces: all over, everywhere, worldwideThis is a great word to use when you're trying to describe something everywhere. A world-wide flu outbreak is something you could say is ubiquitous. It's a big word to have on hand in your vocabulary and you're bound to sound smarter just by using it.

There you have it! Great scholarly words that are sure to blow away your English teacher! I hope that after adding these words to your vocabulary, your writing will improve, but I know there are plenty of fabulous words I didn’t mention! What are some of your favorite words to use in your essays?

This article was written in collaboration with editor Sabrina Yates and Lisa Washington

Feedback Junction

Where Thoughts and Opinions Converge

It's incorrect to say 'myriad of.' This is an amateurish mistake and will highlight the fact that you don't know how to properly use the word. An example of proper usage is, "There are myriad squirrels infesting my basement".

thank you! you are a life-saver!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

very so and so work keep on trying this is not a much advanced levil of writing

Thanks for valuable recommendations.

It advantageous to know one can express their vocabulary through writing.

Thank you so much, this is really going to help me in my next semester ^^

#16 can you use it in a sentence?

Great writing. With my daughter being a high school junior SATs are coming up and I feel this will be crucial to her success as she is a 4.0 + student but lacks the myriad of vocabulary to help her succeed in this standardized test.

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